All Tail No Legs: Snake Blog

A little blog about my derpscales. Occasional cat photobomb.

299 notes

gamerphonzy asked: So... what is headboob, anatomically speaking?

crispysnakes:

It’s the muscles surrounding the jaws.  The shape of the head is determined by the shape of the skull.  

Here’s a boa:

Here’s a boa skull.  Note the structure of the jaws, particularly the back end where sit the the two joints that control the gape of the snake (snakes have five mobile and one immobile joint within their skulls).  See the boxy, rounded shape those two joints make?

Here are the two overlaid:

Now imagine the muscles needed to control those joints.  Depending on the species/size of the snake and the prey they feed on, they’ll need more or less muscle mass to operate their jaws.  

See those big fleshy white things in the corners of the mouth?  That’s all muscle that, when the mouth is closed, occupies the space in the skull that people like to squish.  

That, is headboob.  

138 notes

crispysnakes:








USARK - United States Association of Reptile Keepers

Read this Lacey Act article by Kassandra Royer of Royer Reptiles. You’ll learn something. Then, comment against the Constrictor Rule if you haven’t at www.usark.org/2014-blog/constrictor-rule-1/. And share!"There is an ever-expanding piece of law called ‘the Lacey Act’ that has been around since 1900. It was created to help stop the massive slaughter of native game animals for export by commercial hunters. Today, it does a lot more than that, as government likes to keep adding to their lists of things to do.Perhaps one of the most useless pieces of the Lacey Act is the “Injurious Wildlife List.” Injurious means “causing or likely to cause harm.” The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which is responsible for enforcing this monster, defines Injurious Species as: ” Injurious wildlife are mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, crustaceans, mollusks and their offspring or gametes that are injurious to the interests of human beings, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, wildlife or wildlife resources of the United States. Plants and organisms other than those listed above cannot be listed as injurious wildlife.”When a species is added to the Injurious Wildlife list, it makes it a federal crime to transport that species across state lines. You can keep them, breed them and sell them- within your own state- but you can’t take them if you need to move across the country, and you can’t sell them to someone outside your state.Take a look at the mammals that are currently classified as “Injurious Wildlife”Flying Fox (Fruit Bat)MongooseEuropean Rabbits Raccoon dogBrushtail possumIndian Wild Dog aka DholeMultimammat mouse aka Soft-furred ratHow many do you recognize? How many have you heard about on the news? Any hint that fruit bats or Indian wild dogs are invading the United States and wreaking havoc? Lots of brushtailed possums damaging agriculture? Seen a mongoose lately? Nope. The only animal you’re probably familiar with on that list is the European Rabbit. They are literally everywhere in the United States. They’re all over, fully established feral populations- but if you transport one across state lines- that would be a federal offense. Nevermind that all the domestic rabbits came from the European rabbit…The flying fox is invasive in Australia. Brushtailed possums have colonized New Zealand, and the mongoose is invasive on several tropical islands. The Raccoon Dog is invasive in North Europe.The Indian Wild Dog is not only NOT invasive, it’s now classified as Endangered in what is left of it’s native territory. It is classified as injurious because it kills livestock in it’s home country… A similar situation exists for the multimammate mouse- they cause damage in their native African habitats, but they have not invaded any other countries.Remember the definition which clearly stated the species had to be detriment to the United States? Only the mongoose qualifies, since they are in Hawaii…though the mongoose was listed 59 years before Hawaii became a state. Legislators heard some scary news from other countries and dropped the ban hammer, with little to no consideration of whether or not those animals actually pose a risk to the U.S.Now- let’s take note of which mammals are missing from this list:The wild boar is conspicuously absent. These invasive mammals cause damage to the United States agricultural sector and environment estimated at 1.5 BILLION dollars *per year*. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS.The common house mouse as well as the black and brown rats are NOT native species- we brought them over from Europe! They are responsible for crop and property damage to the tune of over $19 billion dollars a year in the United States. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUSNutria (a beaver sized water rat) are yet another introduced species which can now be found in 40 states. Each year- in the United States, mind you, not some distant country- they are responsible for a minimum of one million dollars worth of damage by wrecking levees, banks and roadbeds with their burrowing activities. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS.You might say, “Well, the rats and nutria have been here forever!” Okay, I see where you are coming from, but remember the Fish & Wildlife Service still thinks the European Rabbit needs to be on the list, and they’ve been around “forever” as well.Two of the first animals added to the Injurious list were the European Starling and the House Sparrow . Yep- those are also not native to North America! They have displaced native species and have been causing crop damage valued at as much as 800 million per year.- They were removed from the Injurious List in 1960 because regulators realized having them listed ***DID NOTHING*** to prevent them from spreading. You don’t say?In the 113+ years that the Lacey Act has been around, dozens of species have been added, most of them very damaging aquatic species (fish, mollusks & crustaceans) Since those species can spread themselves without any help just by traveling through waterways, having them listed is virtually useless as well.It wasn’t until 1990 that a reptile was added to the Injurious Species List- the Brown Tree Snake. You won’t find any in the United States, either. They became invasive in Guam, which, if we are nitpicking- is a US “territory”.In 2012, more species were added- big, “scary” snakes- the Burmese python, yellow anaconda and two subspecies of African Rock Python. Anacondas have never colonized outside of their native south american habitat, anywhere in the whole world. There are no invasive colonies in the United States today. The same is true of the Rock Pythons.The Burmese python- due to the destruction of import facilities by Hurricane Andrew in 1992- were able to establish a small colony in the Everglades. It has been 22 years and they have failed to expand outside of southern Florida. Cold spells in the winters of 2008 and 2010 demonstrated that the Everglades Burmese pythons cannot tolerate temperatures near freezing.Are the Burmese invasive in the Everglades? Absolutely. What is not being said is that a full 25% of the animal life and nearly half of the plant species found in South Florida are NON NATIVE!Now the Fish & Wildlife Service wants to add even more species to the list! They want to go ahead and throw in the other three species of anaconda- even though they are rare in captivity, and have never, ever established an invasive population- not even in the Everglades! They’re also after the famous boa constrictors- which are also not invasive or damaging to anyone, anywhere in the United States. As a matter of fact, there are boas that are native to northern Mexico- if the boa could expand further north, nature would have run that course all by herself! Also on the list- the Reticulated python- which has the impressive record of never having established a colony outside of it’s native range, EVER- and there are no wild colonies in the United States.These species clearly do not fit the definition of Injurious wildlife given by USF&W- but they do represent people’s pets and a niche industry that focuses on the *captive* breeding of fantastically colored versions of these snakes that sell for thousands of dollars both domestically and overseas.With over a century of history under it’s belt, it’s glaringly obvious that the Lacey Act is 100% ineffective at preventing the spread of invasive animals in the U.S. Moreover, the law doesn’t even attempt to curb the activity of the absolute worst of the worst injurious wildlife species- instead focusing on those animals with sensational taglines that “might” possibly be injurious. If it were not so injurious to the US Citizen, the Injurious Wildlife list would quite the joke.Only two things will be accomplished by the addition of these species to the Lacey Act- the destruction of dreams, and the bankrupting of small businesses.http://www.fws.gov/le/pdf/CurrentListInjuriousWildlife.pdf/" - Kassandra RoyerThanks, Kassandra! The reptile community is stronger with people such as yourself working on our behalf.Photo: Boa constrictor longicauda © USARK - United States Association of Reptile Keepers

crispysnakes:


Read this Lacey Act article by Kassandra Royer of Royer Reptiles. You’ll learn something. Then, comment against the Constrictor Rule if you haven’t at www.usark.org/2014-blog/constrictor-rule-1/. And share!

"There is an ever-expanding piece of law called ‘the Lacey Act’ that has been around since 1900. It was created to help stop the massive slaughter of native game animals for export by commercial hunters. Today, it does a lot more than that, as government likes to keep adding to their lists of things to do.

Perhaps one of the most useless pieces of the Lacey Act is the “Injurious Wildlife List.” Injurious means “causing or likely to cause harm.” The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which is responsible for enforcing this monster, defines Injurious Species as: ” Injurious wildlife are mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, crustaceans, mollusks and their offspring or gametes that are injurious to the interests of human beings, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, wildlife or wildlife resources of the United States. Plants and organisms other than those listed above cannot be listed as injurious wildlife.”

When a species is added to the Injurious Wildlife list, it makes it a federal crime to transport that species across state lines. You can keep them, breed them and sell them- within your own state- but you can’t take them if you need to move across the country, and you can’t sell them to someone outside your state.

Take a look at the mammals that are currently classified as “Injurious Wildlife”

Flying Fox (Fruit Bat)
Mongoose
European Rabbits 
Raccoon dog
Brushtail possum
Indian Wild Dog aka Dhole
Multimammat mouse aka Soft-furred rat

How many do you recognize? How many have you heard about on the news? Any hint that fruit bats or Indian wild dogs are invading the United States and wreaking havoc? Lots of brushtailed possums damaging agriculture? Seen a mongoose lately? Nope. The only animal you’re probably familiar with on that list is the European Rabbit. They are literally everywhere in the United States. They’re all over, fully established feral populations- but if you transport one across state lines- that would be a federal offense. Nevermind that all the domestic rabbits came from the European rabbit…

The flying fox is invasive in Australia. Brushtailed possums have colonized New Zealand, and the mongoose is invasive on several tropical islands. The Raccoon Dog is invasive in North Europe.
The Indian Wild Dog is not only NOT invasive, it’s now classified as Endangered in what is left of it’s native territory. It is classified as injurious because it kills livestock in it’s home country… A similar situation exists for the multimammate mouse- they cause damage in their native African habitats, but they have not invaded any other countries.

Remember the definition which clearly stated the species had to be detriment to the United States? Only the mongoose qualifies, since they are in Hawaii…though the mongoose was listed 59 years before Hawaii became a state. Legislators heard some scary news from other countries and dropped the ban hammer, with little to no consideration of whether or not those animals actually pose a risk to the U.S.

Now- let’s take note of which mammals are missing from this list:
The wild boar is conspicuously absent. These invasive mammals cause damage to the United States agricultural sector and environment estimated at 1.5 BILLION dollars *per year*. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS.

The common house mouse as well as the black and brown rats are NOT native species- we brought them over from Europe! They are responsible for crop and property damage to the tune of over $19 billion dollars a year in the United States. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS

Nutria (a beaver sized water rat) are yet another introduced species which can now be found in 40 states. Each year- in the United States, mind you, not some distant country- they are responsible for a minimum of one million dollars worth of damage by wrecking levees, banks and roadbeds with their burrowing activities. NOT LISTED AS INJURIOUS.

You might say, “Well, the rats and nutria have been here forever!” Okay, I see where you are coming from, but remember the Fish & Wildlife Service still thinks the European Rabbit needs to be on the list, and they’ve been around “forever” as well.

Two of the first animals added to the Injurious list were the European Starling and the House Sparrow . Yep- those are also not native to North America! They have displaced native species and have been causing crop damage valued at as much as 800 million per year.- They were removed from the Injurious List in 1960 because regulators realized having them listed ***DID NOTHING*** to prevent them from spreading. You don’t say?

In the 113+ years that the Lacey Act has been around, dozens of species have been added, most of them very damaging aquatic species (fish, mollusks & crustaceans) Since those species can spread themselves without any help just by traveling through waterways, having them listed is virtually useless as well.

It wasn’t until 1990 that a reptile was added to the Injurious Species List- the Brown Tree Snake. You won’t find any in the United States, either. They became invasive in Guam, which, if we are nitpicking- is a US “territory”.

In 2012, more species were added- big, “scary” snakes- the Burmese python, yellow anaconda and two subspecies of African Rock Python. Anacondas have never colonized outside of their native south american habitat, anywhere in the whole world. There are no invasive colonies in the United States today. The same is true of the Rock Pythons.

The Burmese python- due to the destruction of import facilities by Hurricane Andrew in 1992- were able to establish a small colony in the Everglades. It has been 22 years and they have failed to expand outside of southern Florida. Cold spells in the winters of 2008 and 2010 demonstrated that the Everglades Burmese pythons cannot tolerate temperatures near freezing.

Are the Burmese invasive in the Everglades? Absolutely. What is not being said is that a full 25% of the animal life and nearly half of the plant species found in South Florida are NON NATIVE!

Now the Fish & Wildlife Service wants to add even more species to the list! They want to go ahead and throw in the other three species of anaconda- even though they are rare in captivity, and have never, ever established an invasive population- not even in the Everglades! 

They’re also after the famous boa constrictors- which are also not invasive or damaging to anyone, anywhere in the United States. As a matter of fact, there are boas that are native to northern Mexico- if the boa could expand further north, nature would have run that course all by herself! Also on the list- the Reticulated python- which has the impressive record of never having established a colony outside of it’s native range, EVER- and there are no wild colonies in the United States.

These species clearly do not fit the definition of Injurious wildlife given by USF&W- but they do represent people’s pets and a niche industry that focuses on the *captive* breeding of fantastically colored versions of these snakes that sell for thousands of dollars both domestically and overseas.

With over a century of history under it’s belt, it’s glaringly obvious that the Lacey Act is 100% ineffective at preventing the spread of invasive animals in the U.S. Moreover, the law doesn’t even attempt to curb the activity of the absolute worst of the worst injurious wildlife species- instead focusing on those animals with sensational taglines that “might” possibly be injurious. If it were not so injurious to the US Citizen, the Injurious Wildlife list would quite the joke.

Only two things will be accomplished by the addition of these species to the Lacey Act- the destruction of dreams, and the bankrupting of small businesses.

http://www.fws.gov/le/pdf/CurrentListInjuriousWildlife.pdf/" - Kassandra Royer

Thanks, Kassandra! The reptile community is stronger with people such as yourself working on our behalf.

Photo: Boa constrictor longicauda © USARK - United States Association of Reptile Keepers

(via i-m-obnoxious)

262 notes

Governor Quinn Signs the Herptiles-Herps Act!

crispysnakes:

YES!!!  Congrats to Illinois!

(via pedestrianwolf)

903 notes

crispysnakes:

Come on folks, there are only a few days left to comment on this!  Deadline is July 24th!  This Thursday!

All Americans who appreciate their freedom to have pets should comment. This may only affect big snake keepers now, but any species could be the next target. The entire pet community is being picked apart as we are not supporting each other in protecting our freedoms. Support your pet and reptile community and comment today! Over 80 million American households have pets. Over five million of those have pet reptiles. There should be tens or hundreds of thousands of comments made against adding additional species to the Constrictor Rule. This needs to be shared! Below are Talking Points, comment links, mailing address, sample letter, FAQ and more. 
Deadline is July 24 (no extension): Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is taking additional comments regarding listing five species of snakes (Boa constrictor, Reticulated python, DeSchauensee’s anaconda, Green anaconda and Beni anaconda) as injurious under the Lacey Act. These species were originally proposed in 2010. If listed, FWS would ban interstate transportation/commerce and importation. Remember to be professional and civil with your comments.
Comments must be submitted at www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570 and clicking Comment Now! in the upper right. You may also comment at www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570.



WHAT’S THIS ABOUT?  WHAT CAN YOU WRITE?  CLICK HERE AND SCROLL DOWN.



Please guys, if you haven’t yet, go visit the site and comment to defend our ability to keep our animals.  If you missed why this is so important to us (and me) last time, it’s this: once added to the Lacey act, these animals cannot be moved or sold across state lines. 


For me, and in time you (you know they’re coming for BPs and smaller exotics next, just look at the bans coming out of West Virginia and the Carolinas), this means:

1.  If you get a job in another state or have to move to another state, you cannot take your pet(s) with you like a responsible owner.
2.  If your vet is across state lines or you have to seek medical attention for your animal across state lines, you can’t take it there.
3.  You can’t ship in or ship out from your state, destroying any chance at a solid business.
4.  Do you travel from state to state doing educational programs with your animals?  Good luck.  You might be able to get a permit for it.  Maybe.  If they’re feeling generous.
5.  Conservation through captive breeding?  Not anymore. 

And if you get caught trying to take your pet or sell your stock over state lines?
1.  Up to $10,000 in fines
2.  Jail time
3.  Congratulations, you are now a felon.

So again, please help us stop this assault on responsible reptile ownership.

crispysnakes:

Come on folks, there are only a few days left to comment on this!  Deadline is July 24th!  This Thursday!

All Americans who appreciate their freedom to have pets should comment. This may only affect big snake keepers now, but any species could be the next target. The entire pet community is being picked apart as we are not supporting each other in protecting our freedoms. Support your pet and reptile community and comment today! Over 80 million American households have pets. Over five million of those have pet reptiles. There should be tens or hundreds of thousands of comments made against adding additional species to the Constrictor Rule. This needs to be shared! Below are Talking Points, comment links, mailing address, sample letter, FAQ and more. 

Deadline is July 24 (no extension): Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is taking additional comments regarding listing five species of snakes (Boa constrictor, Reticulated python, DeSchauensee’s anaconda, Green anaconda and Beni anaconda) as injurious under the Lacey Act. These species were originally proposed in 2010. If listed, FWS would ban interstate transportation/commerce and importation. Remember to be professional and civil with your comments.

Comments must be submitted at www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570 and clicking Comment Now! in the upper right. You may also comment at www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R9-FHC-2008-0015-4570.
Please guys, if you haven’t yet, go visit the site and comment to defend our ability to keep our animals.  If you missed why this is so important to us (and me) last time, it’s this: once added to the Lacey act, these animals cannot be moved or sold across state lines. 
For me, and in time you (you know they’re coming for BPs and smaller exotics next, just look at the bans coming out of West Virginia and the Carolinas), this means:
1.  If you get a job in another state or have to move to another state, you cannot take your pet(s) with you like a responsible owner.
2.  If your vet is across state lines or you have to seek medical attention for your animal across state lines, you can’t take it there.
3.  You can’t ship in or ship out from your state, destroying any chance at a solid business.
4.  Do you travel from state to state doing educational programs with your animals?  Good luck.  You might be able to get a permit for it.  Maybe.  If they’re feeling generous.
5.  Conservation through captive breeding?  Not anymore. 
And if you get caught trying to take your pet or sell your stock over state lines?
1.  Up to $10,000 in fines
2.  Jail time
3.  Congratulations, you are now a felon.
So again, please help us stop this assault on responsible reptile ownership.

(via jennyrage)

775 notes

xxxtheherpfreakxxx asked: *handing holding pencil thingy* You should draw your snake sausage on ms paint. As much detail as you can manage. This is gonna be great. *opens popcorn*

kookootegu:

I went a little overboard

Bonus:

139 notes

herplove:

In Microgravity, Some Snakes Tie Themselves in Knots, Others Attack Themselves

In microgravity, snakes lose their sense of proprioception, or the awareness of one’s body parts in relation to one another. Once the gravity wheels come off the wagon, snakes no longer seem to know their own bodies from any other physical obstacle they’re bouncing up against. They might perceive that obstacle as an enemy, or, if they think it’s another snake, they might try to bunch up alongside it, a common reaction in stressed groups of snakes, io9 explains. 


(Hopefully my cellphone doesn’t screw with the original quote, if so my bit starts here)If you follow through to the original io9 article there’s a video.I’m… not sure why they think the test snakes are losing sense of themselves. The end of tail coiling in the video is just like when all my snakes want to coil the end of their tail on -anything- as a security blanket (does a kid lose sense of self when they suck their own thumb).The self-coiling is a stiff form and instantly reminds me of what I’ve seen snakes do when trying to float on the surface of water. It’s probably a survival float response when they’re getting lightly tossed against the sides of the cage.They don’t show the self biting and don’t really comment on it so I can’t make much judgement on it. But you know why a snake would normally bite itself? When something hurts.So… yeah, I’m not sure how they got the conclusion that the snake just forgets it’s own body.

herplove:

In Microgravity, Some Snakes Tie Themselves in Knots, Others Attack Themselves

In microgravity, snakes lose their sense of proprioception, or the awareness of one’s body parts in relation to one another. Once the gravity wheels come off the wagon, snakes no longer seem to know their own bodies from any other physical obstacle they’re bouncing up against. They might perceive that obstacle as an enemy, or, if they think it’s another snake, they might try to bunch up alongside it, a common reaction in stressed groups of snakes, io9 explains. 

(Hopefully my cellphone doesn’t screw with the original quote, if so my bit starts here)
If you follow through to the original io9 article there’s a video.
I’m… not sure why they think the test snakes are losing sense of themselves. The end of tail coiling in the video is just like when all my snakes want to coil the end of their tail on -anything- as a security blanket (does a kid lose sense of self when they suck their own thumb).
The self-coiling is a stiff form and instantly reminds me of what I’ve seen snakes do when trying to float on the surface of water. It’s probably a survival float response when they’re getting lightly tossed against the sides of the cage.
They don’t show the self biting and don’t really comment on it so I can’t make much judgement on it. But you know why a snake would normally bite itself?
When something hurts.
So… yeah, I’m not sure how they got the conclusion that the snake just forgets it’s own body.